10 11 / 2013

the-exercist:


The 10 Mistakes You Make When Running
You don’t switch your route: Same time, same route can make for a boring workout — and stats that don’t ever improve. Switching up your route will challenge different muscles, keep you motivated, and improve your running skills. Don’t stick to your tried-and-true trail; find a new running route with these tips.
You don’t fuel right: You may be able to power through a short run without any food, but if you’re going long, you need fuel and water. Time your run so it’s two to three hours after a meal, or have a snack full of carbs and protein (like one of these pre-workout snacks) about 30 minutes to an hour before you go for a run. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water well before you step out; drinking too much right before you go can cause cramps.
You don’t warm up: Starting your run at full force is not a good idea. You’ll feel sluggish, tight, and discouraged if you don’t warm up before that sprint. Do a light jog or five minutes of brisk walking before starting your actual run.
You don’t cool down: You came, you conquered, you’re done with your run. Don’t stop now, however; you still need to take a few minutes to stretch your warmed muscles to help you recover. These postrun stretches will help increase your flexibility and reduce muscle soreness.
You don’t check your form: Running may seem natural, but a few body adjustments can make a big difference, allowing you to run faster, longer, and more efficiently. Make a mental note to pay attention to your running form every once in a while; your shoulders should be relaxed and down, your arms should swing parallel to the ground (without crossing your midsection), and your head should be up and looking forward, not down. Get more tips on proper running form here.
You don’t challenge yourself: If you want to be a better runner, you need to up your pace. Intervals and tempo runs help you increase your speed in the short term, so that in the long run, you become a faster, better runner.
You run in the wrong gear: Sweat-soaked cotton shirts, shoes without enough support, and pants with chafing seams — all of these can cut a run short or at least make you not want to go out again. Invest in a few key pieces once you’ve upped your mileage; you’ll be surprised by how much what you wear matters. Don’t worry, we’ve got you — check out our list of what not to wear when running here.
You push yourself too hard: Challenging yourself is great, but doing too much too soon is a common cause of runner burnout, not to mention injuries. Start off slow and gradually increase your pace as you get more comfortable. Remember not to ramp up your mileage too quickly; increase your total by only 10 percent every week.
Your strides are too long: It may feel good to bound down that trail, but if you make a habit of taking too-long strides, you may tire more quickly. Shorter strides are also easier on your knees, so if you find yourself going long, shorten your steps and see if it feels better.
You’re not consistent: It’s not going to get easier unless you stick with it. Try to run three times a week if you want to become a better runner; you’ll be amazed at how much easier that three-miler seems after just a few weeks of running.

the-exercist:

The 10 Mistakes You Make When Running

  1. You don’t switch your route: Same time, same route can make for a boring workout — and stats that don’t ever improve. Switching up your route will challenge different muscles, keep you motivated, and improve your running skills. Don’t stick to your tried-and-true trail; find a new running route with these tips.
  2. You don’t fuel right: You may be able to power through a short run without any food, but if you’re going long, you need fuel and water. Time your run so it’s two to three hours after a meal, or have a snack full of carbs and protein (like one of these pre-workout snacks) about 30 minutes to an hour before you go for a run. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water well before you step out; drinking too much right before you go can cause cramps.
  3. You don’t warm up: Starting your run at full force is not a good idea. You’ll feel sluggish, tight, and discouraged if you don’t warm up before that sprint. Do a light jog or five minutes of brisk walking before starting your actual run.
  4. You don’t cool down: You came, you conquered, you’re done with your run. Don’t stop now, however; you still need to take a few minutes to stretch your warmed muscles to help you recover. These postrun stretches will help increase your flexibility and reduce muscle soreness.
  5. You don’t check your form: Running may seem natural, but a few body adjustments can make a big difference, allowing you to run faster, longer, and more efficiently. Make a mental note to pay attention to your running form every once in a while; your shoulders should be relaxed and down, your arms should swing parallel to the ground (without crossing your midsection), and your head should be up and looking forward, not down. Get more tips on proper running form here.
  6. You don’t challenge yourself: If you want to be a better runner, you need to up your pace. Intervals and tempo runs help you increase your speed in the short term, so that in the long run, you become a faster, better runner.
  7. You run in the wrong gear: Sweat-soaked cotton shirts, shoes without enough support, and pants with chafing seams — all of these can cut a run short or at least make you not want to go out again. Invest in a few key pieces once you’ve upped your mileage; you’ll be surprised by how much what you wear matters. Don’t worry, we’ve got you — check out our list of what not to wear when running here.
  8. You push yourself too hard: Challenging yourself is great, but doing too much too soon is a common cause of runner burnout, not to mention injuries. Start off slow and gradually increase your pace as you get more comfortable. Remember not to ramp up your mileage too quickly; increase your total by only 10 percent every week.
  9. Your strides are too long: It may feel good to bound down that trail, but if you make a habit of taking too-long strides, you may tire more quickly. Shorter strides are also easier on your knees, so if you find yourself going long, shorten your steps and see if it feels better.
  10. You’re not consistent: It’s not going to get easier unless you stick with it. Try to run three times a week if you want to become a better runner; you’ll be amazed at how much easier that three-miler seems after just a few weeks of running.

(via geekygirlfitness)

08 11 / 2013

nivueniconnue:

Yoga for back flexibility !

From beginner poses to more advanced ones.

  • Cobra pose -  upward facing dog
  • Cat cow pose - I don’t know the name of the second pose
  • Camel pose and its variation
  • Bridge pose and wild thing 
  • Backbend and wheel pose
  • Bow pose and cobra variation

(via onefitmodel)

18 10 / 2013

06 8 / 2013

heyfranhey:

fitabled:

The other day I wrote a post about my issues with squat challenges which you can check out here. Now it’s really easy to point out flaws with something. But it’s another thing all together to do something about it. So I thought I would go ahead and create my suggestion for a 31 day program targeted at giving you an amazing butt. Now you will notice that this program isn’t every day like some programs. This is important to allow your body to recover and get stronger. Feel free to insert your own regular cardio or upper body workouts into the off spaces. If you want to try the program go ahead and download and print the images if you like for your wall. If you have any questions about the program my ask box is always open. 

August 1st is on Thursday. Who’s in???

(via onefitmodel)

23 7 / 2013

tonedbellyplease:

Revamped my old morning yoga post.

tonedbellyplease:

Revamped my old morning yoga post.

(via onefitmodel)

08 7 / 2013

10000steps:

downtownn:

If you are reblogging, please do not remove ANY of this post - you may ruin it for others!
I know, I’ve been a bit busy to update this blog, but when I came across this in the June/July issue of Seventeen I knew that my followers had to see it!
Rules:
Exercise atleast 5 days a week, for 25 minutes. That’s easy!
Eat 5 times a day (fresh food over junk!)
Find 5 new ways to be active every week.
The calendar is essential for this plan, you can print it out here.
You will also need all of these workouts:
Monday: here
Tuesday: here
Wednesday: here
Thursday: here
Friday: here
Good luck, I’m trying this as well, let me know if you’re trying it, too!
(c) 2011 Seventeen Magazine I am NOT responsible for the content, only poorly scanning & uploading it.

reblogging again

10000steps:

downtownn:

If you are reblogging, please do not remove ANY of this post - you may ruin it for others!

I know, I’ve been a bit busy to update this blog, but when I came across this in the June/July issue of Seventeen I knew that my followers had to see it!

Rules:

  • Exercise atleast 5 days a week, for 25 minutes. That’s easy!
  • Eat 5 times a day (fresh food over junk!)
  • Find 5 new ways to be active every week.

The calendar is essential for this plan, you can print it out here.

You will also need all of these workouts:

Monday: here

Tuesday: here

Wednesday: here

Thursday: here

Friday: here

Good luck, I’m trying this as well, let me know if you’re trying it, too!

(c) 2011 Seventeen Magazine I am NOT responsible for the content, only poorly scanning & uploading it.

reblogging again

(via onefitmodel)

28 6 / 2013

11 Highly Effective Tricep Exercises For Women

  1. Bench Dips
  2. Kettlebell Tricep Overhead Press
  3. Football Throws
  4. Side Push-ups

(via onefitmodel)

27 6 / 2013

On holiday? No gym? In a dorm room? Not much time?

These are easy workouts to do inside your room. 

  1. Squat lunge, alternating legs
  2. Elevated push up, mountain climb
  3. Back & forth pike with Push up
  4. Split squat
  5. Sprint on the spot
  6. Elbow to Knee crunch

Do each for 1 minute, 3 sets. 

(Source: nopainnogain-fitness, via onefitmodel)

19 6 / 2013

fitnessgifs4u:

30 Plank Exercises To Shock Your Core (And Body)

  1. Spider-Woman Plank
  2. Plank Up-Downs (“Hell Raisers”)
  3. Side Plank Toe Touches
  4. Tom Cruise Plank (Mission Impossible Style)

See the other 26 plank styles HERE at Lifting Revolution.Com

(via losing-every-extra-pound)

12 6 / 2013

rollergirlred:

healthylivingforyou:

How to Squat With Proper Technique

If you are working out in the gym and could only do one exercise it would be the squat. Why? Because no other exercise challenges the human body to operate as singe unit like the squat. The squat has long been heralded as the “King of Exercises” – and quite rightly so. Whether you’re doing it with weight on your back or all bodyweight, proper form is key. I found this article on squat form, and I thought it was written well, even if it is more towards squatting with a bar.

Benefits of Squatting

One of the biggest misconceptions about the squat is that it is a leg exercise. The squat is in fact a full body exercise. Every muscle in your body is challenged when you squat. The legs and hips push the weight up, the abs and lower back back tense to stabilise your back, and the arms are used to pin the bar onto the back (or help with balance in the case of bodyweight squats).

  • Squats Build Muscle – Squats build muscle throughout your entire body faster than any other exercise. Squatting is a compound exercises that stresses your entire body as a complete unit. The stress put on your body by squats triggers a hormonal release of testosterone in your body. This elevated testosterone aids in producing muscle at a faster rate.
  • Squats improve your athleticism – If you want become a better athlete no other exercise will improve your overall athleticism like the squat. Squatting helps you build explosive strength that carries over to most competitive sports.
  • Squats reduces injuries – Contrary to popular belief, squats do not cause injury (when performed correctly). Performing squats with proper form actually reduces the chance of injuring oneself. Why? Because squatting improves and maintains hip flexibility. Additionally, squats improve the stability of your knees, when using proper squat form (below parallel).

Why you need proper Squat Form

Quite frankly, most people have no idea how use squat with correct form. In fact, I would estimate that 9/10 people I see squatting in commercial gyms today are doing so with extremely poor from.

This is a problem for 3 reasons.

  1. It is dangerous – While squatting with proper form is completely safe, squatting with poor form is extremely dangerous. Incorrect squat technique put a lot of stain on the lower back and knees and can quickly lead to serious injury.
  2. You are seriously compromising the benefits of squatting - When you don’t squat with proper form it completely defeats the purpose of squatting in the first place. Increased muscle, elevated testosterone, improved vertical leap – forget about it.
  3. You look like a complete idiot - To someone who knows how to squat properly there is nothing more pathetic than someone loading the bar up with a ton of weight than not squatting with proper form. Learn how to control your ego and do it right.

How to Squat

The Squat Setup

  • Approach the rack with the bar at approximately mid-chest height.
  • Move under the bar and place it on your back. Hold the bar in place with your hands.
  • Stand with and even stance. Your feet should be shoulder width apart with your feet facing out at a 30 degree angle.
  • Lift the bar out of the rack and take ONLY one step back. Take a big breath. Tense your entire body. Squat.

Squatting Down

  • Start from the hips – Bend at your hips and sit back into the squat. Imagine you are sitting down on a seat. The hips joint should always bend before your knees.
  • Check your knees – Keep your knees out. Your knee joints should be pointing in the same direction as your feet all the way down. If your knee buckle in it normally means that the weight is too heavy.
  • Keep your weight back – Keep your weight distributed towards your heel.
  • Go all the way down – You should always aim to squat to at least parallel. Meaning, your hip joint needs to be at least parallel with your knee joint. This is incredibly difficult to judge yourself, even with the aid of a mirror. Ask someone else to assess your depth either in the gym or by video taping.
  • Think about squatting up - On the way down think about squatting up. This will help to prepare your brain and make the upward movement easier.

Squatting Up

  • Bounce off the bottom – At the bottom position of the squat your hip muscles should be tight – storing energy. Use this energy to help you bounce out of the bottom of the squat. Ensure that you are bouncing off the hips – not the knees.
  • Focus on your glutes – When powering up out of the squat concentrate on squeezing your glutes together.
  • Drive your hips up – Most of the power for the squat comes from the hips. Drive the hips in an upward motion.

Racking the bar

  • Step forward. Ensure that your bar is over the pins before lowering the weight.

25 every intro- every bout.

(via oscarswildetiger)